Beyond beef; Winter’s Turkeys a flavourful favourite in the Calgary Stampede kitchens

Dedicated to using local products whenever possible, the Calgary Stampede Culinary team is passionate about building strong relationships with producers through its Grown Right. Here. program.

“Working with locally raised products is a chef’s dream,” says Calgary Stampede executive chef Derek Dale. “We’re able to live that dream nearly every day.”

The innovative Grown Right. Here. program was created back in 2008 with a focus on showcasing products grown or raised in Alberta. While many visitors come to come to Calgary expecting to see beef on the menu, there are many more equally flavourful options.

“The Stampede is world renowned for the Alberta beef we serve to our guests,” says Dale. “But we also have very strong relationships with other producers, including our local poultry producer Winter’s Turkeys.”

Farming family at Winters Turkeys

Farming family at Winters Turkeys

Located 30 kilometres east of Calgary in Dalemead, Alberta, the Winter’s farm has been raising turkey for four generations. Since 1977 husband and wife team, Darrel Winter and Corrine Dahm have been at the helm, raising free range, certified organic and heirloom turkeys. As a major supplier for the Calgary Stampede kitchens, they provide approximately 8,000 pounds (3,600 kgs) of turkey per year.

“It’s a relationship with many benefits,” says Dale. “We can ensure we are working together to reduce our carbon footprint and practice sustainability, while also being able to serve Stampede guests the best tasting free range and organically grown turkey in Alberta.”

And when it comes down to the cooking, Dale believes the hard work and care the Winter’s farm and other local suppliers put into their products makes it easy for his team. “The quality of the products is so superior, salt and pepper is all you really need to add!”

Derek Dale, Calgary Stampede

Derek Dale, Calgary Stampede

For more information on Winter’s Turkeys visit:

Wintersturkeys.ca
Facebook – Winter’s Turkeys
Twitter- @wintersturkeys
Instagram – wintersturkeys

*This article appears in the Calgary Stampede International Agriculture and Agri-food committee’s Profile magazine. Now available in print, you can also enjoy it online on the IAC web page. You’re also invited to follow the IAC on Facebook or Twitter.

Introducing Calgary Stampede’s newest board members

On March 21, 2017, the Calgary Stampede’s shareholders elected three new directors to the Stampede board: Elizabeth Burke-Gaffney, Dave Lantz and Stuart O’Connor. The board further approved the appointments of three additional directors: Lesley Conway, Greg Kwong and Cindy Provost. The biographies for all of these new directors can be found below.

The Stampede’s board is currently comprised of 20 shareholder-elected directors, four government-appointed directors and five board-approved externally-appointed directors. The externally-appointed directors from the larger Calgary community provide the board with supplementary expertise from specific business sectors that are key to supporting the strength of the Stampede’s leadership in light of the organization’s Master Plan and Strategic Plan initiatives and developments.

David Sibbald, president & chairman of the board, commented on the newly appointed board members, saying ”Lesley, Greg and Cindy will bring tremendous expertise to the board as we move forward with plans to expand the BMO Convention Centre and our youth education platform. They are leaders in Calgary and lend to the Stampede a broader perspective and representation from our community.”

Warren Connell, chief executive officer, added “These individuals understand where the Stampede is going and are passionate about helping us get there.”

The Stampede congratulates the six new directors on their elections and appointments and looks forward to the support of their leadership as the organization drives toward furthering its vision to create a world-class year-round gathering place for the community.

Continue reading

Meet Noran Calf Robe, Indian Village Tipi Owner from Siksika Nation

This year, Indian Village moves to ENMAX Park. The 26 tipis represent the five nations of Treaty 7: Kainai, Tsuut’ina, Stoney Nakoda, Siksika and Piikani. Each tipi has a unique design on the outside. Approximately 500 people will live in Indian Village during the 10 days, with daily performances adding another 1,000 people per day. More than 40 competitions and events take place in Indian Village during the July Stampede.

We caught up with tipi owner Noran Calf Robe whose family has been attending the Calgary Stampede for more than 100 years.

Visitors to Indian Village may recognize recurring tipis and owners year-after-year. The tipi painted with a buffalo belongs to the Calf Robes and has been a part of the Calgary Stampede from the beginning. Continue reading

Introducing Jeff de Boer

I know that all you culture cravers and urban art aficionados are eagerly awaiting the opening of ENMAX Park in July 2016—since we announced that local artist, Jeff de Boer was selected to create a new sculpture to grace the MacDonald Bridge entrance earlier this year, the community has been abuzz with excitement!

Photo credit: Jeff de Boer website

Photo credit: Jeff de Boer website

I got the opportunity to tour de Boer’s studio and learn more about his work, as well as what inspires him to create.

de Boer is a multimedia artist, best-known for his whimsical metal sculptures—you may have seen his work at the Calgary International Airport (Tin Toy) or Cyclone, at the Glenbow Museum. He’s also received a Board of Governors Award of Excellence for his work instructing at the Alberta College of Art and Design (ACAD). An ACAD graduate, who majored in jewelry design, de Boer now works with various mediums to create pieces that surprise, delight and make memories. Continue reading

Calgary Stampede hosts 10 Chinese chefs for kitchen tour

Cowboy culture and a deep appreciation for Stampede time drew 10 Chinese chefs from Shanghai, Guangzhou and Beijing out to tour our Food & Beverage facilities late last month.

These international guests traveled to our fair province to learn more about Alberta Beef, our culinary scene and world-famous hospitality industries; they traveled with Cargill representatives to tour various locations during their week-long stay.

Pictured: (in white jackets) Chef Dale and Chef Kwong making memories with the Chinese tour group and Cargill representatives. Our guests not only got a tour of Stampede facilities, they also got a chance to check out the public art pieces on Stampede Park, like the Roundup, featured behind the group

Pictured: (in white jackets) Chef Dale and Chef Kwong making memories with the Chinese tour group and Cargill representatives. Our guests not only got a tour of Stampede facilities, they also got a chance to check out the public art pieces on Stampede Park, like the Roundup, featured behind the group

Continue reading

Introducing the 2016 Calgary Stampede Royalty

Anticipation filled the air on Stampede Park throughout the months of September and October as the competitions for Calgary Stampede Queen & Princesses and Calgary Stampede Indian Princess were underway. To narrow down to the final three Stampede Queen and Princesses, 21 hopeful contestants took part in a four-week long contest with numerous competitions such as public speaking, equestrian, personal interviews and more. The Indian Princess pageant took place over two weeks, with five applicants and several events, including speech training, horsemanship and attending community events.

Excitement reached its highest peak with the crowning of Stampede Queen Maggie Shortt, Stampede Princess Chelsey Jacobson, Stampede Princess Baillee Billington and Stampede Indian Princess Vanessa Stiffarm. These four new Calgary Stampede ambassadors have already begun the journey of a lifetime; the Royalty have already attended events representing the Stampede and will make more than 400 appearances throughout the year. So just who are these four young women and what are they looking forward to this year?

1 Continue reading

Take time to Honour the Canadian Forces this Remembrance Day

Masterbrand_poppy

At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, Canadians join fellow Commonwealth nations in a moment of silence to mark the end of the First World War. Although hostilities ended on November 11, 1918 the war did not formally conclude until the Treaty of Versailles was signed in June, 1919. Everyone welcomed peace.  Guelph-born Lt. Col. John McCrae served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force and penned “In Flanders Field” about his experience at the Second Battle of Ypres; the poem still serves as a reminder of the sacrifices that members of the armed forces make and is part of the reason we wear poppies each November.

1915 exhibition annual report_men from sarcee camp lined up opening exhibition_military

The cover for the Calgary Exhibition’s Annual Report in 1915 featured a picture of soldiers from Sarcee Camp (based on the Tsuut’ina Reserve) opening the Exhibition that year.

Continue reading

Doors Open YYC is returning to the Calgary Stampede Grandstand!

On September 26 and 27, come get a behind-the-scenes look at some of the Calgary Stampede’s most unique areas. The Stampede tour was among Doors Open YYC’s most popular last year, and we are thrilled to be participating once again. This year, check out the Young Canadians’ costumes, enjoy the view from the Eye in the Sky, get an up-close look at the chutes, and new this year, tour the Infield suites.

Photo Credit: Shaun Robinson / Calgary Stampede

Continue reading

Western Oasis trees donated to help create Calgary Board of Education outdoor learning areas

The Western Oasis is renowned for its one-of-a-kind art, peaceful ambiance and lush greenery. It’s truly an oasis at the heart of Stampede Park!

Photo Credit: Tye Carson / Calgary Stampede

Photo Credit: Tye Carson / Calgary Stampede

Illuminated by more than 2,000 soft lights, the sound of trickling water and the beautiful scents of more than 1,600 flowers and shrubs, as well as dozens of trees, Western Oasis is a welcome sanctuary away from the hustle and bustle of the rest of Stampede Park.

While it would be wonderful treat to keep Western Oasis as a permanent fixture inside BMO Centre, we are excited for these trees to become part of the Calgary Board of Education’s (CBE) outdoor learning areas. All 68 Western Oasis trees, Brandon Elms, Dropmore Lindens, Sargent’s Poplars and Witchita Blue Junipers, have been donated to the CBE.

Continue reading

A real Stampede “Feel-good” story: the Stampede Talent Search volunteer experience

On the Stampede Talent Search committee, Stampede time is the culmination of a year’s worth of work. And along with that a full range of emotions and experiences compressed into just ten days.

From the physical demands of running rehearsals, wrangling contestants and producing a state-of-the-art nightly show – to the emotional highs and lows of your favourite contestants moving on – or not – to the next round of the competition, it’s a marathon to get through the ten days. But it’s a marathon at sprint speed.

Shawna and Tristen Chang

Supporting our Junior performer, Tristen Chang, during a Saddledome Steps performance.

Last night was the final show of the competition where we named our 2015 Champion, Christian Hudson. And in a few quick moments after being named Champion, he promptly vowed to donate his $10,000 cash prize to the Calgary Drop-In and Rehab Centre.

Christian demonstrated the true reason behind why we do what we do at Talent Search; we believe that this competition changes lives.

Continue reading

Sharing the local love

We’ve seen some really good online discussion on local products at the Calgary Stampede, and wanted to provide some context about the nature of local at the annual Stampede and some of the local initiatives we have running year round…

With our origins as a fair, festival and exhibition it’s always been a mix of showcasing our community to the world by highlighting local talent, businesses, farmers, producers, artists and artisans and bringing entertainment, products and services from outside of Calgary to our community.

We’re thrilled that the Stampede is more than just what happens at Stampede Park. It’s the Amber Approved breakfast at Hotel Arts, it’s the Citadel community barbecue, and it’s the Calgary Ismaili community’s sunset breakfast. Stampede is the sum of all the different celebrations, barbecues, concerts, customs, pancake breakfasts and community connections that make Calgary extra awesome in July.

Back at Stampede Park, when we organize the annual Stampede we are always balancing things: old and new, tradition and modern, local and global.

Pictured: downtown Calgary

Continue reading

New rodeo chutes offer added safety features

It may be the 101st year for the Calgary Stampede, but it is the first year for the newly installed rodeo chutes that take centre stage at the Infield. Built to last, these chutes have already survived floodwaters and will be up and running for Stampede.

Incorporating the latest technology and features, the new steel system for rodeo pens and chutes is specially-designed to anticipate and head off any potential snags or opportunities for risk to both riders and livestock. The new system was suggested to the Stampede by independent livestock handling specialist Jennifer Woods.

The new gates feature higher bars with less spacing between them, which minimizes the chance of a rearing bull or horse catching its hooves between the bars. In addition, the new safety spring-loaded latches are much easier to open if a bull or horse leans into the gate. Rubber safety pads absorb an excited animal’s kick. New grooved cement flooring packed down with infill give bulls and horses secure footing in the chutes. The steel panels all match from the animals’ pens, into the chutes, the arena and back again, which means the animal will not be spooked by seeing anything new or unexpected. Jennifer tells us the entire system is designed to keep the animal calm and feeling secure.

The new system replaces 30-year-old steel that remained very safe and functional, and experts say it was already extremely rare to see any problems. Even so, updating the new chutes aligns with the Stampede’s goal of doing everything possible to eliminate any foreseeable risks to animal and human health.