Make the Stampede part of your story – leave a legacy gift and support youth development

IMG_9062

The Young Canadians show their zest for life!

“You don’t know this yet, but you are about to win your second world championship and will go on to win your third next summer! Remember how you feel right now. The passion, the strength, the determination, they will follow you forever,” wrote Katie a Calgary Stampede Showband member in a reflection letter to herself.

For Katie and many others, being a part of the Calgary Stampede’s performing arts programs is about more than performance excellence, it’s about building confidence. Since joining the Stampede Showband, Katie’s confidence has soared and she’s become part of a community of champions.

The Calgary Stampede Showband are five-time world champions and challenge young Calgarians to think about what it means to be a citizen, an active member of their community, while learning about western heritage.

May is Leave a Legacy month and the perfect time to finalize your legacy and become part of the Stampede’s story. A planned gift to the Calgary Stampede Foundation will help build the next generation of community builders, change-makers and trailblazers.

“When you support the Calgary Stampede Foundation, you are supporting programs that motivate and engage youth, empowering them to do amazing things. These programs are an important part of the fabric of our city and create a generation of young people with the skills, confidence and drive to make the future brighter,” says Sandra Lunder, manager, philanthropy & community investment.

DSC_0764

The Calgary Stampede and Calgary Stampede Foundation are extremely proud to create opportunities that support our talented youth, allowing them to grow into the leaders of tomorrow.

By becoming part of the Stampede’s story your generosity will enhance our performing arts, agriculture programs and unique educational experiences, such as: the Calgary Stampede Showband, The Young Canadians School of Performing Arts, 4-H programs, Stampede School and the OH Ranch Education Program.

Past president of the Calgary Stampede and generous donor, Bob Thompson sheds some light on why he chose to support the Stampede, “For me the choice was an easy one. My family has a long history with the organization and I understand and believe in the great contributions the Stampede makes to the community and to youth achievement. The difference these programs make is nothing short of amazing.”

Without donor contributions, we wouldn’t be able to offer youth the opportunity to realize their potential, hone their talents and build valuable leadership capabilities.

parade.girl

The Calgary Stampede Showband has 140 members and travels all over the world!

“We appreciate every donor and contribution to help the Stampede continue its important work of shaping the future of our city,” shares Lunder.

What is planned giving?

A planned gift is a donation you make during your lifetime, but which the Calgary Stampede will not receive until sometime in the future. There are several types of planned gifts, such as: bequests in your will. We can work with you to tailor-make a gift that helps you fulfill the lasting legacy you want to leave.

Together we can make a difference in the lives of the youth in our communities.To discuss opportunities to make the Calgary Stampede part of your legacy, please contact:

Sandra Lunder, manager, philanthropy & community investment 403.261.9345 or slunder@calgarystampede.com.

7 Things to Know About the Stampede Showband’s 2017 Production: Mosaic

In celebration of Canada’s 150 birthday, the Calgary Stampede Showband is thrilled to announce its 2017 production, Mosaic. Local audiences will have the opportunity to see Mosaic at Music ‘n Motion on Sunday, May 14, 2017 and at Showbands Live! on Sunday, July 9, 2017 and Tuesday, July 11, 2017. The Stampede Showband will also perform the music from the production every evening on the Saddledome Steps during the 2017 Stampede, happening July 6–16, 2017.

Here are 7 fun facts about the show:

1. Mosaic is a special collaboration with the Stampede’s Indian Events Committee. It has been designed in collaboration with local historians and Indigenous leaders and features local Indigenous youth drummers, singers, and dancers who will wear their own regalia during performances.

2. Acclaimed local poet and star of Making Treaty 7, Alanna Blackrider Onespot, is leading the collaboration and storytelling as the showband’s Indigenous artistic director.

First Nations youth

Stephanie Big Plume, Shenoa Snow, Alanna Blackrider Onespot, Anthony Crowshoe and Dakota Martial attended their first Showband rehearsal earlier this winter.

3. The production is all about the past, present, and future of Canada and its people, exploring themes of purity, conflict, reconciliation, diversity and inclusion.

4. Music will include A Movement for Rosa by Mark Camphouse, Time, Forward! by Georgy Sviridov, Godspeed! By Stephen Melillo, and Hymn to the Sun with the Beat of Mother Earth by Satoshi Yagisawa.

The Showband uses music and movement to tell a story. This year, the Showband will be joined by Indigenous dancers, drummers, and singers.

The showband uses music and movement to tell a story on the field.

5. The Stampede Showband’s design team includes some of the world’s top marching arts professionals, including: front ensemble; Ian Hale, percussion; Colin McNutt, program design; Keith Potter, drill design; Jamey Thompson, colour guard design; Jennifer Leseth  and musical arranger; Michael Klesch. This talented group have worked with elite ensembles including: the Cavaliers, Carolina Crown, The Cadets, Phantom Regiment, the Madison Scouts and Boston Crusaders (if you don’t know who these groups are, it’s worth looking them up on YouTube).

6. This summer, the Stampede Showband will travel to the Netherlands to compete in the World Music Contest (WMC), where they’ll share Canada’s story on the world stage performing Mosaic for over 20,000 people in Kerkrade.

7. Approximately 800 hours of rehearsal time will go into preparing for the competition in Kerkrade!

Can Marching Band Save the World?

Aaron Park, manager, youth education programs, thinks it’s a start, which he shared in his recent Walrus Talk.

“Are my students successful now and in their futures? Does what they learn in the Stampede Showband prepare them for their future careers, quality relationships and to make an impact in their community?” he asked rhetorically.

As five-time world champions, the Stampede Showband is about so much more than just music and performance excellence. It’s about building character in Calgary’s youth and developing important leadership skills that help shape the community leaders of tomorrow.

aaron

Aaron Park delivers his Walrus Talk on March 9, 2017 in Calgary.

“While we’re focused on performance and music at the highest level, we know that this is not the end goal of our students,” he shares. “They go on to be more than musicians; they go on to be engineers, teachers, doctors, volunteers and community leaders.” Continue reading

Introducing the Calgary Stampede OH Ranch Historical Centre

In late 2016, the Calgary Stampede Foundation hosted the first tour of the OH Ranch Historical Centre, which illuminates the long and storied history of the OH Ranch. The Historical Centre is located in the basement of the OH Ranch Cookhouse.

OH Ranch Jan 2015_S Murray pics (2)

Previously, cowboys used the basement of the cookhouse as a bunkhouse. The room was complete with 60s era shag carpet and a few old couches. Now, thanks to the Foundation and generous donors, the basement has been revitalized into an inviting educational space.

Students of the OH Ranch Educational Program and visitors to events at the ranch can learn about past and present owners, like Bill Siebens who donated the OH Ranch to the Calgary Stampede Foundation in 2012. They can also see a bison coat and learn about the role of the North West Mounted Police police in western Canada, and come face to face with a bison head and learn about the original inhabitants of the land—First Nations peoples.

16OHopening0124

16OHopening0080

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students can try on cowboy clothing and learn about the jobs of ranch hands who have lived and worked at OH Ranch.

16OHopening0075

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or, follow a timeline that traces the OH from its origins into the future.

16OHopening0067

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today, the Calgary Stampede is the steward of the OH Ranch, which is protected as a Heritage Rangeland with the Nature Conservancy of Canada. The rich history and tradition that are lived every day on the ranch is now preserved and shared in the OH Ranch Interpretive Centre.

Where in the world is the Showband headed next?

The Calgary Stampede Showband is thrilled to announce that they will be travelling to compete in the World Music Contest (WMC) in Kerkrade, The Netherlands in summer 2017. WMC is the Olympics of music taking place over four weeks from Thursday, July 6 – Sunday, July 30, 2017. The event will feature more than 260 musical ensembles and 20,000 individual musicians. The Showband will be leaving right after Stampede to compete in the marching show band class on Sunday, July 30 against 60 other marching show bands from around the globe.

Photo credit: Kien Le

The Showband is a youth performance ensemble that rehearses and performs year round. Photo credit: Kien Le.

Continue reading

Why colour guard is the unexpected sport your child should try this year

When you’re wondering what sport or activity your child should try this year, colour guard usually isn’t the first thing that comes to mind – but it should be! Colour guard is what we call the group of athletes/performers/dancers that twirl flags and toss (fake) rifles in front of marching bands. They’re extremely impressive but no one really knows how to join a colour guard, how you learn those skills, or what the colour guard does when they aren’t leading a parade. To answer these questions and more, the Escalade Winter Guard Association is hosting a colour guard Youth Development Camp this month, providing beginner instruction in dance, flag, and rifle skills – perfect for youth of all ages! Plus, if your tween/teen likes it, they can sign up to join the Calgary Round Up Band or Calgary Stetson Show Band this season. Still not convinced? We’ve got 8 reasons your kid should give colour guard a try this summer:

1. They don’t call it the “sport of the arts” for nothing! Colour guard is called the “sport of the arts” because it brings music to life through performance in a competitive format. Performers demonstrate skill, agility, strength and endurance through choreographed movement, dance and use of props set to music to tell a story. Every season, colour guards rehearse several times a week to prepare for competitions. They make it look easy, but it takes a huge amount of skill to gracefully spin and toss colour guard equipment.

The Stampede Showband is an auditioned group for youth ages 16-21. Taylor Fraser, pictured here, is preparing to toss her "rifle" into the air, so it'll spin six times, and then catch it. Photo: End Credits

The Stampede Showband is an auditioned group for youth ages 16-21. Taylor Fraser, pictured here, is preparing to toss her “rifle”. It’ll spin in the air, and she’ll catch it without missing a beat. Photo: End Credits.

The coaches and instructors are seasoned veterans who have performed and competed at the highest levels. Many of the instructors with Calgary’s colour guard ensembles performed with the Calgary Stampede Showband and Drum Corps International (DCI) ensembles, and continue to compete in local elite ensembles like Escalade. Continue reading

Don’t miss your chance to win up to $1 million with Stampede Lotteries!

The Calgary Stampede Lotteries made history last night when the Split’Em 50 pot hit $1 million – and it’s growing by the minute. That means this year’s winner will win more than $500,000—and up to a whopping $1 million! That’s right—there are $2 million worth of Split’Em 50 tickets available.

But only $2 million worth. With half of the tickets already sold and five days left of Stampede 2016, come down to Stampede Park and get in on the biggest Stampede Lotteries jackpot in our history!

Lotteries

Continue reading

Tips for your audition for The Young Canadians School of Performing Arts

Auditions for The Young Canadians School of Performing Arts (TYC) are in full swing. To help you with your audition, we’ve compiled a list of audition tips from TYC members and instructors. Good luck to everyone this weekend!

 

Tips from members of The Young Canadians

1. It’s okay to be nervous. You need that adrenaline. Take that nervous energy and turn it into good energy.

 

2. Always be a little early. It’s very important to warm up properly, whether that means stretching or warming up your vocal cords.

Photo Credit: Bill Marsh / Calgary Stampede

 

3. For a dance audition, make sure to dress properly! It’s important to wear something that flatters you but doesn’t overshadow your dancing. Along with dressing properly, having the right dance shoes is essential.

 

4. Get plenty of rest the night before. It’s the best way to relax your body. Also pack snacks and a water bottle—your body will appreciate it.

 

5. Choose a song that suits your voice but don’t be afraid to experiment!

 

Tips for Dance from a TYC instructor

1. Let your personality and individual style shine through.

2. Show us your performance and confidence.

3. Ensure your body is stretched and warm heading into the audition.

4. Get ready to be quick on your feet and pick up combinations across the floor and in the centre promptly. 

5. Relax, enjoy and show us your love of dance! 

The Young Canadian

Tips for Vocal from a TYC instructor

1. Choose a song you are comfortable with and that showcases your talents.  

Show us who you are, not who you think we want you to be. Personally, I always prefer to see something done really well, even if it is a “simpler” song choice, over a piece that is too difficult.  

TYC vocal 

2.  Prepare.  

Take the time to prepare your piece so that when you enter the room you feel ready and can hopefully enjoy yourself. Auditions can be very intimidating, but it is also a chance to perform, so have fun. Practicing will help you to feel confident about what you are presenting. Warm up before you get there and run through your piece the day of the audition. This way you can review things and work out any last kinks. Drink water, not only the day of, but the day before.  

 

3.  Be kind.   

Being kind and gracious to everyone you encounter during the audition process is important. If you have someone playing for you or helping set up your track, be nice to them, and say thank you. If you are using sheet music, put it in a binder (the pianist will appreciate it). Don’t only be nice to us when you are in the room, be nice the entire time you are there.  

 

4.  Be confident, even if you have to rehearse it.

You can take time to practice walking into the room, introducing yourself and announcing your selection. Enjoy yourself while you perform your piece, and show us your personality. You are not only showing us your voice, but also who you are, so find the confidence to let that show through.  

 

5.  Don’t forget that we are on your side.

Every time someone walks in the room, we are excited to hear them. We want them to do well and have a good experience. We take notes to help ourselves remember everyone, and though we may look serious, we are enjoying ourselves and engaged in you. We may ask you to try different things or test your range; this is not to throw you off or see you fail, we are simply trying to get to know you better. We want to see you do well, so think of us as an audience there to support you instead of a panel taking notes behind a table. 

 

An additional tip….HAVE FUN!   

 

7 Things Musicians (and everyone else) Should Know About Being Around Horses

Since 1985, the Calgary Stampede Showriders have been accompanying the Stampede Showband in parades as a mounted colour guard made up of 12 young riders and their horses. This pairing of horses and marching musicians is unusual and a lot of prep work goes into making sure that the horses are comfortable with the band.

Every year, the Showband and Showriders rehearse together to help desensitize the horses to the craziness of parades, and teach the Showband how to act around horses. It’s a great opportunity for the mostly city-dwelling band members to learn more about agriculture and animal care, especially since the Showband spends a lot of time around animals during the 10-day Calgary Stampede. Here’s a peek at what they learned from the Showriders this year!

Showrider Hannah Braun, 15 years old, and her horse Tokahee teach a group of Showband members about performing around horses.

Showrider Hannah Braun and her horse Tokahee giving a group of Showband members tips for being around horses.

 1. Don’t run through the barns

You don’t want to turn a corner and run into or startle a horse. Don’t jump for the same reason.

2. Use your inside voice

Shouting and screaming can upset horses. Horses are reactive and pick up on the energy of other people an animals around them.

3. Stay a horse length away from a horse’s back-end

That way, even if the horse kicks out, you’ll avoid getting kicked.

Showband member Cassie Groves got to bond with Tohakee, petting the horse from the side so as not to startle the horse.

Showband member Cassie Groves pets Tokahee from the side so that she doesn’t startle the horse.

 4. Ask permission before approaching horses or offering them treats

Sometimes, like with the Showrider “Stand and Pat” events, it’s obvious that you’re welcome to approach a horse. If you’re walking through the barns or see a horse on its own, ask the owner if it’s okay to pet the horse. This is the best way to avoid getting bitten!

5. Approach horses from the side

Horses have blind spots directly in front and behind them. A horse can see you best if you approach from the side and pet their shoulders and back. Plus, if you approach a horse head-on and try to pet its face, it might think your fingers are treats – yikes!

6. Never play instruments while you’re walking through the barns

Sudden movements and unexpected loud noises can startle horses and they might react to the sight of shiny instruments and noise from musical instruments more than you’d expect.

 7. Ask questions

The Showriders love to answer questions about their horses. They spend a lot of time caring for their horses to keep them healthy and happy and are eager to share what they know with others, especially if it helps to keep their horses and others safe.

 

Showband 2016: In Pursuit

The Calgary Stampede Showband is thrilled to announce its 2016 production, In Pursuit. Inspired by classic heist films and television, the production will take the Showband’s audiences on an intriguing and exciting chase as the band tracks down a stolen briefcase. Check out the quick teaser trailer below!

In Pursuit will feature music including Steve Reich’s “Electric Counterpoint”, John Powell’s “Tangiers”, Paul Lovatt-Cooper’s “Equilibrium”, Adele’s “Skyfall”, and the theme from The Streets of San Francisco. Oscillating between minimalist, comical, and dramatic elements, this production will have a wide emotional range. According to the Calgary Stampede’s Director of Bands Aaron Park, In Pursuit will be both suspenseful and fun. “It’s not necessarily a story about detectives or spies, although it has that same feeling of mystery and intrigue. It’s sort of a ‘catch me if you can’ story; everyone is after the same elusive briefcase and what may be inside. “Electric Counterpoint” is woven throughout the show as a recurring motif to bring out that feeling of pursuit, mystery, and intrigue.”

Continue reading

How to be an Arts Champion

Fiddlers. Break dancers. Painters. Sculptors. Singers.

130 young people armed with brass and kettle drums.

Calgary Fiddlers

The Telus Youth Arts Showcase was an inspiring start to the Mayor’s Lunch for Arts Champions.

As the Calgary Stampede Showband, joined by the Stetson and Round Up bands thundered “Jubilateo” (commissioned for the Showband as part of the 2012 Stampede Centennial celebrations) to open the lunch, I couldn’t help but feel a little humbled by all the time and passion that these young people, their instructors and their parents invested to bring them to that moment.

Stampede Showband

The Mayor’s Lunch for Arts Champions “celebrates the transformative power of the arts, building momentum for the future.”

Arts Showcase_Pulse Studios

If we believe that arts are a vital part of any vibrant community, how can we support? How can we be an arts champion?

In her welcome message, Patti Pon, president & CEO of Calgary Arts Development and chair of the Stampede Community Projects and Development volunteer committee writes:

“[Arts champions] see the arts as a good thing, as something of value, as a way to make discoveries to connect with others, to celebrate life, and to make meaning about what it is to be alive. They see arts as a way to develop youth into their best selves and to help tell our stories in the world.”

Youth Showcase

Did you know that Calgary Arts Development invested in 150 arts organizations on behalf of the City of Calgary in 2015 alone? Wow.

When I started working for Stampede, I had no idea how invested the organization is in the arts.

Stampede invests in youth development programs like the Stampede Showband and The Young Canadians of the Calgary Stampede. Did you know that every one of the participants in these programs is given a scholarship by the Calgary Stampede Foundation?

The new Youth Campus will be a hub for creativity—as home to the Calgary Opera, Calgary Arts Academy in addition to the aforementioned youth programs.

The Public Art volunteer committee works to bring public art works that tell the story of our western heritage—they have brought works like Outlaw to the community, and By the Banks of the Bow to Stampede Park. They will unveil a new artwork in ENMAX Park this May.

Western Showcase committee brings Western Canada’s largest Western Art Show to Stampede each year, showcases crafts, culinary arts and runs an artist-in-residence program throughout the year.

Youth Talent Search gives young people the chance to showcase their craft and winners get access to incredible resources, including a $10,000 grand prize.

The great takeaway? There are infinite ways to be an arts champion and we all have the capacity to be one.

The Stampede is honoured to work with artists of all ages – to invest in the next generation of creatives and patrons. And to live in a city where arts and arts champions abound.

John Philip Sousa and the Calgary Stampede Showband

John Philip Sousa, the American conductor and composer who popularized the sousaphone, has a special connection to the Calgary Stampede. The Calgary Stampede Showband is playing Sousa’s “The Thunderer” (1889) as part of its concert band repertoire this year, but the connection doesn’t end there. Sousa and his band, the “Sousa Band” actually visited the Calgary in 1919 and performed at the Calgary Exhibition.

1919_tnSousa’s band toured all over the world following the end of WWI and was exceptionally popular because Sousa had combined everything he liked about other types of ensembles (brass bands, military bands, orchestras, and beer hall bands) to create something different. Photos from the Glenbow Archives show that there was a huge audience when Sousa’s band performed in Calgary. Sousa was known as the “march king” for composing and arranging patriotic marches, so it makes a lot of sense that the Showband and other marching bands continue to play his music.

The Showband performed “The Thunderer” at its annual Celebration Concert earlier this month, and will perform it again when it competes in the Alberta International Band Festival on February 21 at the Rosza Centre. Continue reading

Allie Patch teaches us the importance of learning new things

Allie Patch has been playing trumpet as a member of the Calgary Stampede Showband since 2012. A linguistics major at the University of Calgary, she’s now the Showband’s brass captain, a member of leadership team, and teaches brass to junior high age students in the Calgary Round-Up Band. As a member of the Showband, she rehearses weekly and once a month on weekends for concert band performances and learning the Showband’s summer field show production. In addition to teaching and school work, this makes for a pretty busy schedule! On top of all this, Allie decided to learn color guard this year for the first time and joined Calgary’s prestigious Dynamic Winterguard.

“Sometimes the best thing you can do for yourself is immerse yourself in something completely different.”

In color guard, often referred to as the “sport of the arts”, performers use props and movement to tell a story with music. Most marching bands and drum corps have a color guard, but many groups perform on their own during the winter season as “winter guards”. Most color guard performers start early, learning and honing their skills in junior high and high school. Allie, an already accomplished musician and third year university student, decided to take up color guard this fall, “After playing so many kinds of instruments growing up, I wanted to try something new. Some things have come easier than others – hard rifle tosses are difficult – but it has been a really fun challenge.”

1B9A8661

Allie, performing with Dynamic Winterguard earlier this season.

Continue reading

Showband Tour 2016: Midwest USA

What does the Calgary Stampede Showband do the week before the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth? They go on tour across the Midwestern United States of course! This summer, the Showband will travel to perform in Minnesota and Wisconsin from June 24 to July 5, 2016, coming back to Calgary just in time for the 10-day Calgary Stampede.

In 2015, the Showband won "Best in Show" at DCI's SoundSport competition in Indianapolis.

In 2015, the Showband won “Best in Show” at DCI’s SoundSport competition in Indianapolis.

Taking their unique brand of western hospitality and performance on the road, the Showband’s tour will include a stop at the Vikingland Band Festival in Alexandria, Minnesota. The Showband will perform in the Vikingland Band Festival parade (which features only marching bands!) and will perform its 2016 field production in exhibition at the what is considered the largest and most prestigious summer marching band competition in the Midwest. Continue reading

What gifts will you give this holiday season?

You’re invited to The Spirit of Christmas, presented by The Young Canadians School of Performing Arts, on Sunday, December 6, at the Jack Singer Concert Hall. This uplifting performance celebrates the greatest gifts we can give each other this holiday season, inspiring audiences to think about the gifts that come from within.

Dancers and singers act out numerous gifts throughout the performance, including the gifts of compassion, joy, laughter, peace and more. “[This year’s performers] were asked to bring their own life experiences into the pieces, which creates those deeper threads,” says Cyndi Scott, director of dance development.

Our inner gifts

Our inner gifts

Continue reading