Join the Calgary Stampede for Jane’s Walk on Saturday, May 7

Know where one of the largest pieces of public art in North America is located? Ever wonder what the first Stampede Parade was like? Heard the story of the first saddle bronc champion in Calgary and the famous horse he rode?

Photo Credit: Bill Marsh / Calgary Stampede

For the answer to these questions, and many more, join members of the Stampede’s Public Art and Historical committees on Saturday, May 7, for a guided tour of the many and varied public art pieces on Stampede Park.

The tour begins in front of Cowboy’s Casino (421 – 12 Ave SE) at 2 p.m. and is part of Jane’s Walk, an event started nine years ago to honour the legacy of Jane Jacobs, a writer and an activist who believed that great cities are created by the people who live in them. Jane’s Walks are now held around the world to encourage people to connect with each other and explore their communities.

Meant to be a walking conversation rather than a lecture, during the tour, Stampede volunteers will share interesting stories and notable facts about the more than 15 pieces of art on Stampede Park, from larger than life wall murals to grand bronze sculptures, each depicting people and events that have shaped the history and identity of our city.

The Calgary Stampede , Friday, July 6, 2012. Photo by Mike Ridewood

If the weather doesn’t cooperate, or for those who would appreciate help getting around the Park, the Stampede Trolley will be available to take people from piece to piece along the route.

We’d love to share our history and our art with you! Whether you are new to the city or a lifelong Calgarian, the art walk is sure to provide some new insight into “The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth.”

In addition to special events like Jane’s Walk, self-guided tours of the public art on Stampede Park are available with the aid of the art walk guide. And for more information on Jane’s Walk and the other events being held in Calgary May 6-8, visit janeswalk.org/canada/calgary.

Jane’s Walk : Come and see the art of the Calgary Stampede

Jane’s Walk is Sunday, May 3. We are meeting in front of the Cowboy’s Casino at 2 p.m. and we’d love to have you join us. Bring a camera and your art appreciation hat.

Once again the Calgary Stampede is participating in Jane’s Walk. The Public Art committee, together with the Historical committee, is set to share the art and history of the Calgary Stampede. Normally a walking tour, ours is more of an on-and-off guided trolley ride that follows the Stampede art walk.

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We will visit nine sculptures and eight murals. Each one is rich in history. We love sharing our stories with the community.

The Stampede’s passion for public art dates back to 1912, when Ed Borein and Charlie Russell showcased their artwork at the Calgary Stampede. By the 1980s, the Western Art Show had become a regular feature of the 10-day Stampede. Today, the Stampede’s annual Western Art Show is one of Canada’s most significant art shows. The Stampede also celebrates art and western heritage year-round through the historical mural program and the parade of historical posters.

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Your chance to bring great art to Stampede Park

We are excited to announce an open call to artists for the first public art installation in ENMAX Park. The park will offer the community new year-round places to gather on Stampede Park. The submission deadline is 4 p.m. (MT) on Monday, January 05, 2015, and the project has a budget of $200,000 CAD. For an overview of the project, please visit the Public Art Committee website; for specific details, please read the official RFP.

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Public art serves to spark conversation, engage the community and shape the environment. Cities throughout the world rely on public art to create landmarks and present meaningful cultural environments for locals and tourists alike. Pieces can interpret or memorialize the past, like the cenotaph at Central Memorial Park, or be interpretations of a theme, like Do Re Me Fa Sol La Si Do, by Joe Fafard in the Calgary Court Centre park (pictured above).

At the Calgary Stampede, the Public Art committee oversees the implementation of art on Stampede Park. From historic murals to “By the Banks of the Bow,” which features 15 horses and two riders crossing the river, the committee is dedicated to telling the stories of and celebrating western heritage. We are proud to place a key role in ensuring Stampede Park is truly a year-round gathering place for the community.

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George Brookman, past president of the Stampede, introduced the public art program by saying that “public art helps us remember our past, honour our ideals, express our shared values and give voice to our future aspirations.” It is this spirit that characterizes the Public Art committee and our vision of the role of public art both on and off Stampede Park.

Below is a rendering of the Heritage Walk Corridor that shows the location of the art pieces.

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Jane’s Walk shares Stampede art and history

 Jane’s Walk is Sunday, May 4. Meet in front of the Cowboy’s Casino at 2 p.m.

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From the 1880 Agricultural Exhibits, to Guy Weadick’s Dream for The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth, to the first chuckwagon race in 1923 to the journey of the horse and cowboy By the Banks of the Bow—experience Stampede and Alberta history and spirit at Jane’s Walk on Sunday, May 4, 2014.

The two-hour guided walk begins at 2 p.m. in front of the Stampede Casino and winds it way through Stampede Park. No need to register – just come out, bring your interest in art, walking shoes and a camera.

Members of the Stampede Public Art and Historical committees will guide you to seven sculptures and eight murals. The two committees work closely together to showcase the most significant pieces of art at Stampede Park.

“Being part of Jane’s Walk gives the Stampede a chance to share its public art collection with Calgarians,” said Jill Cross, Public Art committee chair. “Each piece of art is a story. For example, when we visit By the Banks of the Bow, the narrative takes you right there, to the river the horses are trying to cross. Each horse represents a special character the artists conjured.”

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The Stampede’s passion for public art dates back to 1912, when Ed Borein and Charlie Russell showcased their artwork at the Calgary Stampede. By the 1980s, the Western Art Show had become a regular feature of the 10-day Stampede. Today, the Stampede’s annual Western Art Show is one of Canada’s most significant art shows. The Stampede also celebrates art and western heritage year-round through the historical mural program and the parade of historical posters.

The Calgary Stampede Public Art committee was created in 2008 with a mandate to reach out to our community at large, to tell the story of, and retain our western heritage and values. To date, the committee has proudly unveiled two significant pieces of art: “Outlaw,” honouring one of the rankest bulls ever and “Do Re Me Fa Sol La Si Do,” Joe Fafard’s story-telling horses which we also gifted to our sister-city, Quebec City in honour of its 400th anniversary. Both of these pieces reside in downtown Calgary. The last bronze that was unveiled, in June 2012, was “By the Banks of the Bow;” with 15 horses and two riders crossing the Bow, it is said to be one of the largest pieces of art in North America!

The Stampede also celebrates art and western heritage year-round through the historical mural program and the parade of historical posters. The Public Art committee also works closely with the Historical Committee to showcase the most significant pieces of art at Stampede Park.

The Calgary Stampede Historical committee preserves, presents and promotes the history of the Calgary Stampede starting from its earliest days as a fair in 1884, to the first Stampede in 1912, all the way to present day.

From the Jane’s Walk website.

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About Jane’s Walk: Jane’s Walks are free, locally organized walking tours, in which people get together to explore, talk about and celebrate their neighbourhoods. Where more traditional tours are a bit like walking lectures, a Jane’s Walk is more of a walking conversation. Leaders share their knowledge, but also encourage discussion and participation among the walkers.

More than 100 cities participate in Jane’s Walk.

About Jane Jacobs: Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) was an urbanist and activist whose writings championed a fresh, community-based approach to city building.