A look back at Aggie Days

We had the best time at this year’s Aggie Days, at Stampede Park on Saturday April 8 – Sunday, April 9, 2017. It was open to all ages and attendees received free admission alongside enjoying many activities such as sheep shearing, cow milking, livestock auctioneering, the amazing corn maze and so much more!

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Stampede Princess, Lizzie Ryman with a baby goat at Aggie Days.

We had the opportunity to interact with a variety of farm animals from tiny piglets to giant draft horses. I even got to feed Manny the llama a treat, straight from my lips!

Aggie Days teaches people of all ages about the importance of agriculture and how our community revolves so greatly around it. Queen Meagan’s fondest memory of attending Aggie Days was a little girl holding a sweet baby chick and getting to know all of the horses, of course!

Some special events are also held at Aggie Days, such as the Clock Stock and Barrel, where we got to watch athletic dogs herd a group of sheep into a pen with only voice commands. Or if you preferred to take part in the “horsey” side of things, the Extreme Cowboy Race was great, where horse and rider made their way through a complicated obstacle course! Both events were extremely fun and free to attend.

Next year, you’ll probably find us hanging around Aggie Days as part of the Queens’ Alumni Committee, where we will participate in Giddy-Up Aggie Days, an event for special needs. You might also catch us cuddling baby lambs or laughing at Princess Brittany being dragged around by a miniature donkey! (I only say this because it has happened before.)

We hope to see all of your smiling faces there next year!

The passion behind princessesing

In our family, the passenger seat of my Grandpa’s red Chevy pickup proved to be a beautifully unique classroom for my unscripted education. Somehow every tool that you could ever need was handily tucked in the back of that truck.

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As we drove along slowly checking fences, cows, horses and the growing hay, I have come to value more than just the view. My role as “gate girl” was pretty important to me, and while I used to think that being someone’s right hand man was a real thing, I did my best to always position myself on my Grandpa’s right hand side. Seriously. I wouldn’t let anyone else stand in my spot.

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We grew some pretty wonderful values on our farm, and these lessons have extended far beyond that for me. They are my heritage. Raised surrounded by western values, I have learned that short cuts don’t work, but ingenuity can. Bailer twine is the single most functional item ever made. The electric fence is always on. Take your boots off on the porch before entering the house. And finally, that a good dog is better than some people.

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