Cowboy poetry week: “A Real Partner”

In honour of Cowboy Poetry Week, Sunday, April 19 to Saturday, April 25, we are featuring poems by Doris Daley! Today’s poem is called “A Real Partner.”

Born and raised in Southern Alberta ranch country, Doris Daley writes cowboy poetry that celebrates the humour, history and way of life of the west. Doris has been an emcee and featured performer at every cowboy festival in Canada as well as several in the United States, including Texas, California, Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Montana and Oregon. In 2004 she was named Best Female Cowboy Poet in North America by the Academy of Western Artists. At the November, 2009 WMA Awards Show, Doris won top honours for Best Female Cowboy Poet and best cowboy poetry CD.

Pictured: Grace Bensell (Florence LaDue) and Guy Weadick

Pictured: Grace Bensell (Florence LaDue) and Guy Weadick

A Real Partner

My name is Guy Weadick, how do you do?

A pleasure to meet you, Miss Flores LaDue!

The horses are saddled, would you care for a ride?

I’d love to step out with you by my side.

I’ll tell you my dreams about a big wild west show.

I’m throwing a big loop by the banks of the Bow.

Mr. Weadick, I’m told, you talk big and bold.

That’s fine with me,  ’cause ordinary leaves me cold.

I’d love to go riding, as it happens I’m free

Any horse that has hair is just dandy with me.

I’ve had my eye on you from the start

When you’re throwing your loop, you might aim for my heart.

 

She had her trick rope and he had a dream,

They aimed for the stars and they pulled as a team.

With sparkle and spunk they could conquer the world.

A gamble, a promise, a plan was unfurled.

They rode side by side and they rode to succeed,

And they did it! They started the Calgary Stampede.

 

A daring-do husband, a plucky young wife

Hell bent for leather, lived larger than life.

They were partners in work and partners in play

They rode by a standard that lives on today.

A heart full of Try. A world full of Yes…

A legacy branded the C Lazy S.

 

1951, her last setting sun.

Her saddle is empty, her last race is run.

A cowboy heads west, a grave stands alone

Three little words are carved on a stone.

Three little words, but they stand true and tall:

A Real Partner, and that, in the west, says it all.

 

 

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